When Smart City Initiatives Fail – and Why

12 factors that contributed to Smart City hardships.
In Bas Boorsma’s book, “A New Digital Deal. Beyond Smart Cities. How to Leverage Digitalization for the Benefit of our Communities” he has dedicated a chapter to lessons learned.

Sensative take: The failure often has an underlying reason; vertical solutions with locked-in data. This limits the usability of the harvested data, limits interoperability between organizations, prevents scalability, and limits access to legacy data and systems.

Lack of vision and architectural understanding is the real problem. The solution is horizontal open IoT, as provided by the Sensative Yggio platform.

A decade of smart city projects: What worked and what didn’t

Cities have learned that residents offer an important real-world reality check on tech-centric and data-driven work.

Lessons learned: It’s not about technology, apps, and flashy buzzwords. It’s about technology that works in real life solving real problems.

Towards the smart city of 2025 – Smart Cities World

From tech trends to behavioural shifts and new ways to make smart cities economically sustainable, Matthew James Bailey explores what the next five years could look like.

The next 5 years is very much about maturity;

  • Trials and POCs will become mainstream capabilities.
  • Massive IoT roll-outs enabled by LPWANs like NB-IoT and LoRaWan.
  • Cities will turn into ecosystems of the city, municipalities, regions, buildings, public spaces, utilities, companies, citizens. Multiple data owners and legal entities collaborating in a secure and controlled way for mutual benefits.
  • and more, highlighted in this article…
New Wave Of Smart Cities Has Arrived – And They’re Nothing Like Science Fiction

An abandoned mine shaft beneath the town of Mansfield, England is an unlikely place to shape the future of cities. But here, researchers from the nearby University of Nottingham are planning to launch a “deep farm” that could produce ten times as much food as farms above ground. Deep farms are an example of what the latest wave of smart cities look like: putting people first by focusing on solving urban problems and improving existing infrastructure, rather than opening shiny new buildings.

Smart City projects are becoming less flashy show-offs and are turning to solve real issues. By using the right technology in close cooperation with the city operation and the citizens, real progress is being made.

Think Big, Start Small, Scale Fast.

Sensorer varnar för höga vattennivåer – UochD

Under lucka 14 i Future by Lunds julkalender berättas det om att man använder sensorer för att varna för höga vattennivåer i Malmö stad.

Ytterligare en intressant tillämpning på Sensatives IoT-plattform Yggio.

The dream smart city

A Smart City is a city where life has become very easy.

Check out this cool animation about Smart Cities, a vision that we share and work with here at Sensative.

The video is from REMOURBAN, an EU-funded project aimed at producing sustainable urban regeneration models for towns and cities to follow in their efforts to become more ecological and citizen-friendly.

Boston municipal buildings target carbon neutrality

Following an executive order, building construction must be low-energy and fossil-fuel-free, while meeting annual energy needs from a mix of on- and off-site renewable energy assets.

Boston clearly shows that the success of a (smart) city requires smart buildings that generate and share IoT data. They put the requirements on utility companies and real estate owners to share and report between each other to enable optimization and investments in carbon-free technologies.

In 2019, BERDO (Building Energy Reporting and Disclosure Ordinance require the following portfolios to report their annual energy and water usage for January 1, 2018 – December 31, 2018:

  • Nonresidential buildings that are 35,000 square feet or larger.
  • Residential buildings that are 35,000 square feet or larger, or have 35 or more units.
  • Any parcel with multiple buildings that sum to 100,000 square feet or 100 units.

The ambitious target:

  • 100 percent reduction in annual carbon emissions from large buildings in 2050
  • 100 percent of covered buildings reach their carbon targets or complete alternative compliance payment
FIWARE at SCEWC 2019 – YouTube
This year’s edition of the Smart City Expo World Congress (SCEWC) has come to a close, and we can look back on a fantastic, informative, engaging, and above all, fruitful event. FIWARE Foundation headed to Barcelona in November with 16 exhibitors, the Smart World by FIWARE and a lot of motivation to show the world what we – the FIWARE Community, are doing to help cities throughout their transformation journey, by adopting common standard APIs and information models.
In this video, you will find two scenes with Robert & Morgan from Sensative. The first where we just signed our partnership with ATOS, and the second when we sign up as Gold Partner of the Fiware Foundation.
Being ‘hyperconnected’ boosts cities’ ROI – Smart Cities World

Hyperconnected leaders include Singapore, Hong Kong, New York, Seoul, London, Melbourne, Copenhagen and Dublin.

It is about re-using sensors, systems, and data across domains and departments in a structured and smart way. It is about having a centralized capability overseeing everything.

That is, it’s about horizontally integrated Smart City and IoT.

Removing the roadblocks to smart city ROI

“We need to find ways to fuse data from different sensors into a common data platform that will enable multiple departments to leverage shared infrastructure to deliver integrated smart city services.

Increasingly, smart city solutions will incorporate multiple device types and communication networks, all seamlessly connected in a unified platform. This dynamic ecosystem will enable sensors to collaborate, so we could have an application deployed and paid for by different departments that would create value in new ways.

For instance, smart parking is a great example of what could be achieved when data is shared across multiple city departments and applications. Today, searching for parking accounts for approximately 30 per cent of traffic on certain city streets. A smart parking solution, when viewed in isolation, can improve quality of life by reducing congestion. But if the department of health also deploys air quality sensors in these areas, they can see the impact of these investments on local air quality, which increases the return on investment by improving public health and accelerating progress towards sustainability goals. If departments continue to work in isolation, however, they will not get the insights and understanding of how these benefits accrue.”

The solution is already available and deployed in live cases: Yggio – the operating system for Smart Cities.