Open standards: The answer to the smart city data dilemma | Smart Cities Dive

Many organizations involved in smart services are privately owned and use their own proprietary service platforms. This approach tends to discourage competition for more cost-effective services.These complexities mean we are at risk of a smart cities stalemate, with potential technological or monetary barriers rendering services inaccessible for residents.

First of all, we need to have standards. The next step is to have these standards interoperable.

We remember those early days of mobile phones. Every supplier had its own tech and joining with other suppliers in creating standards. We had GSM, TDMA, CDMA to mention a few, and they were all incompatible. You couldn’t bring a phone on a trip since it just didn’t work in another country. In the end, GSM ate them all. Without interoperability, you will have fierce competition to the death. And to a huge cost. All phones had to be replaced to the winning standard, all losing networks had to be replaced.

Open standards with interoperability with “fellow standards” and legacy technologies are the way forward for a future proof smart city.

Or anything IoT for that matter.

Amazon announced in-house wireless protocol for smart home – “Sidewalk”

At its annual smart home hardware event, Amazon announced a new wireless protocol called Sidewalk, developed in-house by the e-commerce giant.

And here comes another one…

What IoT and Smart Homes need are less and not more standards. The users want one single and easy to use app for anything in their home, not one per standard or supplier. They also want to be able to pick and chose the best sensor or device from their need and point-of-view from a variety of suppliers.

Read more about this in our blog post: What’s preventing the IoT market from really taking off? IoT must be de-cluttered to get commoditized

The Connected Ship | Nordic Innovation

This project will support a more sustainable, digitalized and connected maritime industry.

Ships are increasingly being automated and maritime equipment is often controlled by software and programmable devices. However, these control systems on-board are isolated vertical systems dedicated to specific tasks that are not able to communicate with each other or share data.

The goal of the Connected Ship project is to develop and implement a horizontal ship digitalization platform to connect the different digital automation systems and sensor networks across different communication standards on board a ship. This will allow for the shipowners to access and analyze more relevant data to improve vessel performance and reduce costs.

Sensative part: The IoT platform Yggio and all related activities.

Interested in Sensative R&D projects? Read more here

Uppkopplad infrastruktur för färre elavbrott och smartare soptömning – Sydsvenskan

Ska resultera i färre elavbrott och smartare soptömning.

Ett spännande projekt där vi gemensamt testar ny teknik och nya lösningar. Ur Sensatives perspektiv är det extra intressant med de nya säkerhetslösningarna vi implementerar då Kraftringen har extra höga säkerhetskrav.

Connectivity Options for Smart Cities: LPWANs and Cellular Networks

Resilient connectivity can make or break a smart city solution. This article discusses key considerations in choosing the right network for a smart city.

“All the networks are better in their own way, as explained above, and the choice of which to use may vary depending on the requirements, timelines, and budget. The conclusion is that a heterogeneous network approach is necessary for smart cities. Smart cities should be built using solutions and connecting via a wide range of wireless networks, including 5G.”

A temperature is a temperature disregarding what transport technology or sensor vendor you use, but today it comes in a variety of different formats, meaning that different services can’t re-use that data.

To make it manageable, interoperable and useful you need a middleware that abstracts the underlying technologies, a translator to and from the different technologies.

Future-Proof Smart Cities: the Case of Bordeaux

Bordeaux-Métropole (Greater Bordeaux) set its ambitions high: It aims to be a state-of-the-art smart city and community with citizens at the centre of its digital transformation strategy. Bordeaux has been…

“But when investigating how IoT applications could support other city operations, Bordeaux found that the technologies required would often rely on different connectivity and data models.

It became clear that deploying IoT in silos (e.g. lighting, mobility, waste management) would limit the ability to scale smart city solutions. It also became clear that IoT platforms based on open standards are best capable of supporting a diverse range of IoT applications, the sharing of associated data (subject to proper permissions) and avoid lock-in to technology providers.”

Then Bordeaux decided to develop their own IoT platform based on available open building blocks. This is a very common next step in the evolution of smart cities. But, not necessarily the last. There comes a time where maintenance becomes a challenge. People leave, code gets old, and it is difficult and extremely costly to keep the pace with the tech development.

The same reason why very few develops their own HR or CRM systems today. Why develop it inhouse when you can buy a much better product and at a considerably lower cost?

A better strategy is to buy that IoT capability as-a-service, from a specialized supplier that drives tech development in regards to interoperability, data quality, security, etc. Sensatives Yggio is a leading interoperability platform, based on open-source FIWARE, integrating everything, exposing all data, events, and functionality through a common standardized API. And we provide it as-a-service so that we guarantee that we always support the latest IoT technologies.

As a city, you should focus on what to do with the information, and not on data acquisition.

The Future of PropTech Will Be Mass Integration | Propmodo

The past several years have demonstrated that real estate technology is on an upward climb, delivering undeniable value to the largest asset class in the world.

“…an interconnected system in the workplace will no longer be a thing of the past, the linking of manpower, technological devices and other items of business will become a necessity as opposed to just a perk. Office users now use 50 different tech products throughout their day, and none are connected, making being productive less than simple. “

The biggest challenge for property owners is the plethora of systems, vendors, and technologies already installed in the buildings. Adding new tech like IoT makes it even harder to integrate and build upon.

What you do need is an operating system for the building, a platform that handles all the technology in the building, providing a standardized way of developing services and applications, very much as a computers operating system manages all the internal components and attached peripherals. SW developers do not need to address what a manufacturer of the memory board, hard drive or printer has implemented, it is all managed by the OS.

The OS for buildings is called Yggio, provided by Sensative.

Nu blir elskåpen smartare i Lund – Kraftringen

Det mesta av en stads infrastruktur är i dagsläget inte uppkopplad, vilket innebär att den kontrolleras manuellt, eller kanske inte alls. Genom att bygga upp ett nät för kommunikation av sensordata och förse infrastrukturen med sensorer blir stadens funktioner både bättre kontrollerade och effektivare underhållna.

Ett första steg i detta arbete är att göra elskåpen smartare. Under två veckor kommer Kraftringen att installera smart teknik i tjugo elskåp runt Mårtenstorget.

Det är spännande att se när gemensamma utvecklingsprojekt blir till verkliga tillämpningar, då vi, som medlemmar i SOM, är mycket aktiva i detta projekt med vår IoT plattform Yggio. En viktig komponent är den innovativa kommunikationssäkerheten som behövs i denna miljö. Kraftringen vill ju få in larm och kunna kontrollera status, utan att kunna hackas eller störas ut.

Detta är bara ett första steg. Spännande utveckling följer… 🙂

The Strategy of Selecting an IoT Platform (2019) – By Daniel Sexton

IoT is much more expansive than what most of us think of as the traditional Internet. It is growing faster too. There are more devices, protocols, security concerns, RF frequencies, architectural components, services, data, and related products. IoT is massive and broad.

As such, the term ‘IoT Platform’ is really too broad to be useful to most people. I outline an example IoT platform below, but, in some regards, the concept of an ‘IoT Platform’ is about as meaningful as an ‘Internet Platform’ circa 2004. In fact, IoT has a lot more moving parts.

One high-level example of what an IoT Platform should manage

One of the most challenging parts of many IoT projects is managing the hardware devices. This primarily means safely provisioning, maintaining and updating sensors and edge devices. Accordingly, much of the IoT literature (and many new products and startups) is centered around the communication between cloud-based UIs, edge devices, and sensors — MQTT, security keys, OTA firmware updates, RF frequencies, et al.

The analytical challenges of IoT data

Most data is never analyzed. Most companies are not data-driven. Both will have to change if companies are to be successful at IoT. But there are analytical challenges with IoT data.

The surge of IoT data comes with a lot of economic value, estimated at around $11 trillion by 2025. But it also comes with some significant challenges in terms of aggregating data from disparate, distributed sources, and applying analytics to extract strategic value.

  1. The primary challenge of IoT data is its real-time nature. Analytics will have to happen in real-time for companies to benefit from these types of data.
  2. Then there is the issue of time series data. The system must be capable of collecting, storing, and analyzing vast volumes of time series data. The challenge here is that most conventional databases are not equipped to handle this type of data.
  3. The distributed nature of IoT data, where most of the information is created outside enterprise data centers. IoT analytics itself, therefore, will have to become distributed with some analytics logic shifting out of the cloud to the edge. IoT analytics will have to be distributed across devices, edge servers, gateways, and central processing environments.

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Not highlighted by this article is the challenge to acquire and get the data into the system at all. Most legacy systems, and even those that call themselves “smart” or “IoT” are proprietary solutions that lock in data and events in their environment or service, so-called data silos. It is just tough to re-use this in a broader application, like BI.

And then comes the problem of incompatible standards, hundreds in IoT, especially when you try to connect things from a different domain. How do you connect a BACnet speaking device in an MQTT driven platform, that should control another device talking Z-Wave, for instance?

What you need is a swiss army knife type of multi-standard IoT tech integration service. You need Yggio. Or you won’t have a complete foundation for the analytics at all.