Nu blir elskåpen smartare i Lund – Kraftringen

Det mesta av en stads infrastruktur är i dagsläget inte uppkopplad, vilket innebär att den kontrolleras manuellt, eller kanske inte alls. Genom att bygga upp ett nät för kommunikation av sensordata och förse infrastrukturen med sensorer blir stadens funktioner både bättre kontrollerade och effektivare underhållna.

Ett första steg i detta arbete är att göra elskåpen smartare. Under två veckor kommer Kraftringen att installera smart teknik i tjugo elskåp runt Mårtenstorget.

Det är spännande att se när gemensamma utvecklingsprojekt blir till verkliga tillämpningar, då vi, som medlemmar i SOM, är mycket aktiva i detta projekt med vår IoT plattform Yggio. En viktig komponent är den innovativa kommunikationssäkerheten som behövs i denna miljö. Kraftringen vill ju få in larm och kunna kontrollera status, utan att kunna hackas eller störas ut.

Detta är bara ett första steg. Spännande utveckling följer… 🙂

The Strategy of Selecting an IoT Platform (2019) – By Daniel Sexton

IoT is much more expansive than what most of us think of as the traditional Internet. It is growing faster too. There are more devices, protocols, security concerns, RF frequencies, architectural components, services, data, and related products. IoT is massive and broad.

As such, the term ‘IoT Platform’ is really too broad to be useful to most people. I outline an example IoT platform below, but, in some regards, the concept of an ‘IoT Platform’ is about as meaningful as an ‘Internet Platform’ circa 2004. In fact, IoT has a lot more moving parts.

One high-level example of what an IoT Platform should manage

One of the most challenging parts of many IoT projects is managing the hardware devices. This primarily means safely provisioning, maintaining and updating sensors and edge devices. Accordingly, much of the IoT literature (and many new products and startups) is centered around the communication between cloud-based UIs, edge devices, and sensors — MQTT, security keys, OTA firmware updates, RF frequencies, et al.

The analytical challenges of IoT data

Most data is never analyzed. Most companies are not data-driven. Both will have to change if companies are to be successful at IoT. But there are analytical challenges with IoT data.

The surge of IoT data comes with a lot of economic value, estimated at around $11 trillion by 2025. But it also comes with some significant challenges in terms of aggregating data from disparate, distributed sources, and applying analytics to extract strategic value.

  1. The primary challenge of IoT data is its real-time nature. Analytics will have to happen in real-time for companies to benefit from these types of data.
  2. Then there is the issue of time series data. The system must be capable of collecting, storing, and analyzing vast volumes of time series data. The challenge here is that most conventional databases are not equipped to handle this type of data.
  3. The distributed nature of IoT data, where most of the information is created outside enterprise data centers. IoT analytics itself, therefore, will have to become distributed with some analytics logic shifting out of the cloud to the edge. IoT analytics will have to be distributed across devices, edge servers, gateways, and central processing environments.

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Not highlighted by this article is the challenge to acquire and get the data into the system at all. Most legacy systems, and even those that call themselves “smart” or “IoT” are proprietary solutions that lock in data and events in their environment or service, so-called data silos. It is just tough to re-use this in a broader application, like BI.

And then comes the problem of incompatible standards, hundreds in IoT, especially when you try to connect things from a different domain. How do you connect a BACnet speaking device in an MQTT driven platform, that should control another device talking Z-Wave, for instance?

What you need is a swiss army knife type of multi-standard IoT tech integration service. You need Yggio. Or you won’t have a complete foundation for the analytics at all.

How IP cameras, IoT sensors can combine to make cities smarter – asmag.com

Needless to say, video surveillance plays a critical role in smart city initiatives. Now, with more and more IoT sensors being deployed, they can work with IP cameras to make cities even smarter, safer and livable.

Many reasons why our partnership with Axis Communication is so important for Axis, us at Sensative, and our customers in smart buildings and cities.

Advancing BIM: Digital Twins

It’s time to learn how to create, visualize and analyze digital twins

Since Bentley is a 3D company (CAD/GIS/Visualization, etc) they argue for the need to construct the digital twins. We fully agree, since we look one step further, how to utilize the digital twin.

The first step is the visualization of assets and historical data in a 3D model. But, the real usefulness comes when the digital twin is updated with real-time data and events from the real world, creating a digital mirror image. This is done through the integration with IoT. Then you will have a complete 3D dashboard to the real world, a control center where you can plan, act,  simulate scenarios, and optimize depending what is happening right now.

The model will never be better than the access to data.

Why Los Angeles decided to open source its future – TechRepublic

The Los Angeles Department of Transportation needed a way to improve traffic, so it open sourced it.

“Cities increasingly see the value in open source as a way to save money, avoid vendor lock-in, and get access to the most capable, tested, and widely-supported technology solutions. Most cities aren’t looking to eliminate vendor relationships, but rather to make sure they’re getting the best value for the taxpayer money they spend on technology.”

This is true Smart City thinking.

Global smart city technology revenue to reach $1.7 trillion by 2028

Revenue for the global smart city technology market will reach $1.7 trillion by 2028, according to market intelligence firm Navigant Research.

Smart cities are gradually instrumenting the urban fabric at every layer, and cross-sector benefits are starting to be realized.

This is what we mean with IoT interoperability. That IoT services can communicate through a plethora of standards to any type of sensor. Across every domain or sector. Enabling cross-domain services with real-time, technology-neutral, normalized data.

The IoT: Yesterday’s Predictions Vs. Today’s Reality

Here’s a look at some of the key predictions we at Forbes Technology Council initially had for a fully connected world, the reality we are dealing with today and how businesses can best prepare for the IoT’s continued evolution.

The biggest obstacle is the complexity of technologies, standards, silos and legacy systems. IoT requires interoperability and co-operations in eco-systems to be able to deliver on the expectations.